Posts Tagged ‘Sen. Sherrod Brown’

Card Check: So That Didn’t Happen …

Card check was the 800-pound gorilla in the 2008 election. By 2010 it was the issue almost every politician — except die-hard friends of Big Labor bosses — was looking to avoid taking a vote on or voicing support for as the anti-democratic, job-killing Employee Free Choice Act languished.

Well, now Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown (D) has announced the federal legislation’s Time of Death. He said today “It’s not going to happen now.”

And a good thing, too. Union members didn’t like it. The vast majority of employees (non-union) didn’t like it. Voters didn’t like it. Politicians didn’t like it. It was the bill so bad it had multiple fatal flaws.

As with all bad ideas, though, the core threat lives on the action of the seemingly captured agency of the National Labor Relations Board, where Member Craig Becker is pushing Big Labor’s agenda big time. Check out our friends at MyPrivateBallot.com for running news on the Board.

From Whence Card Check Compromise Comes?

As business leaders have been warning for quite some time, “compromise” on the Employee Free Choice Act is going to be hard (if not impossible) to come by because the original bill is so bad. Anything that attacks workplace democracy, imposes government bureaucrats to run small businesses, and kills jobs just isn’t going to be workable with a few tweaks around the edges.

Yet as the public has increasingly decided that EFCA is a no-go, real talks for improving labor law has been a no-show because unions and top Democrats seem to be “compromising” amongst themselves — which is not a real compromise. Which is why this story in today’s The Hill is important:

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) is one of a half-dozen senators trying to craft a compromise on the Employee Free Choice Act (EFCA), which if passed would make union organizing much easier.

Sen. Brown says he’s corralled some Republicans into talks, though we find it difficult to believe that productive negotiations can be led by the Senate’s most liberal member — one who feels it appropriate to introduce legislation attacking ostensibly unpatriotic employers.

Only when EFCA is totally scrapped can there be productive discussions on addressing labor laws, and all parts of the political spectrum need to be at the table.